The Critical Role of Wheat Lectin in Human Disease and the Role of Gluten in Cultural History and Consciousness.

Sayer Ji

  • The history and evolution of wheat
  • The drug-like affects of wheat on the brain
  • How wheat may be contributing to your food allergies
  • How wheat lectins compromise immune function
  • The truth about wheat and the blood-brain barrier
  • How wheat germ agglutinin wreaks havoc on our health
  • Identifying lectin sensitivity

You spoke and we listened. We've added a spot for comments for those of you that aren't on Facebook.

Comments

comments

59 Comments

    Steven Anthony

    Fabulous informative session. Sayer is brilliant

    Robin Williams

    Sooooo, I’ve been gluten-free for over two years. Alot of symptoms have dissapeared. I’m wondering if the Neuropathy in my feet will ever get better?

      Sayer Ji

      Hello Robin! One of the potential problems that remains is chitin-binding lectin (wheat lectin is chitin-binding lectin), found in nightshades (e.g. potato and tomato) and other grains (e.g. barley, rice). Here is more information on that http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/rice-potato-tomato-may-be-inflammatory-wheat

        Jan

        I’ve also been, for the most part, gluten free for two years, but still have osteoarthritis in my hands. Could this be from this chitin-binding lectin as well? I was going to eliminate dairy and eggs first to see if they could be the culprit. Thank you! Great presentation!

    Han Kumani

    Amazing researcher! This should definitely be spread far and wide.

      Grace

      Hi Grace, I can’t tolerate grains, legumes or nightshades (including corn and soy for sure) but I can tolerate grass fed dairy just fine. I think the lectins in dairy may be the problem for some people (like me) but dairy from cows that graze on grass seem to have no inflammatory effect for me, especially raw dairy. (Kerrygold from Ireland markets excellent pasture fed cheese and butter). You would be amazed at how many foods exist on this planet that are not lectin-poisons, but it is a shift from the standard American fare…

    grace

    if you cut out grains, dairy, soy, corn, legumes and also nightshades – not much left to eat – especially when some speakers are also saying to limit root vegetables.

      Sayer Ji

      Grace – you are correct, insofar as the modern Western diet has bottlenecked itself into an extremely limited number of monocultured plants, and their secondary reiterations (grain-fed dairy products and meat, for instance). Could this be why we are plagued by chronic, degenerative diseases, i.e. ‘Diseases of Affluence,’ as Loren Cordain’s groundbreaking work documents. I believe so. I would say, however, for those without severe health issues, eliminate wheat and cow’s milk and you are making great strides in the direction of eating a more biologically appropriate diet for our species.

    CK Carson

    Excellent presentation! Was the downfall of the Roman Empire due to wheat crop failure? Wheat defense system — did you say prions? I couldn’t hear the last part of that.

      Sayer Ji

      The ‘wheat defense system’ involves Wheat Germ Agglutinin (WGA), also known as ‘wheat lectin.’ Here is my article on the topic: Opening Pandora’s Bread Box: The Critical Role of Wheat Lectin in Human Disease. http://www.greenmedinfo.com/page/opening-pandoras-bread-box-critical-role-wheat-lectin-human-disease

    Joyce

    Another fascinating presentation! I’m a celiac — gluten free for two years, though I’ve likely had this disease for years before my diagnosis. I found your discussion of lectins interesting as I’ve been having some peripheral neuropathy, despite sticking to the gluten free diet. I’m now going to remove grains and nightshades to see if things improve. I thought I knew a lot about gluten, but this summit has been an eye opener. Thank you so much.

      Sayer Ji

      Hello Joyce! This sounds like an excellent idea. When we move towards a more biologically appropriate diet many seemingly treatment-refractory diseases improve, and some even disappear. Please let me know how you are doing after you try this out! sayerji@greenmedinfo.com Warm regards!

    Kathy

    I see you as the bridge to doctors for disseminating information through all the research going on. Doctors can’t keep up on all the journals and you seem to enjoy digesting, summarizing and pulling all the puzzle pieces together to make the connections. Thank you for your valuable service!

    sharon

    Wow! This was even better than your “Dark Side of Wheat” article. Amazingly detailed about WGA and those crafty Romans…

      Grace

      Hi Marie, sweet potatoes are not a nightshade, and are fine. I can’t tolerate rice, nightshades, legumes or any grains due to the high lectin content. I make bread, pancake batter and pizza crust with coconut flour and butter from pasture fed cows. I don’t miss any of these foods because they all cause debilitating pain and inflammation. There are lots of other foods in existence. Truly.

    Marie

    So what exactly can we eat? Now I’m confused…are you saying that potatoes and rice are bad as well? What about sweet potatoes? Please help! The gluten free bread I find are loaded with preservatives but I am going to try making my own and hope it is good. This is so horrible, how they’ve lied to us for all these years. Thank you for any help on this.

      Sayer Ji

      Good questions! Well, the question “what exactly can we eat” is a difficult one, as there are so many different situations. Also, there is a point where if you focus entirely on optimizing your diet to perfection, this focus itself — call it orthorexia if you will — is itself compromising your health. Now, if you have a significant health problem, say, arthritis. I do think it highly advisable to remove anything which ‘chitin-binding’ lectins, e.g. nightshades (tomato, potato), and grains as a category. There are the dicotyledonous plants which include quinoa, amaranth and buckwheat if you still would like the aesthetic experience (mouth feel, etc.) of a ‘cereal grass grain,’ but not the deleterious effects (of course, even dicot foods like those mentions can provoke reactions, though much rarer and/or less intense). I would say, if you are removing wheat and cow’s milk from your diet, that’s a huge step and the baseline of healthy eating. If you want to take it to the next level, eliminate or reduce grains, and remember that when you are eating “gluten free,” steer clear of GF junk food, i.e. anything with a label generally is less whole, less nutritional, than say something from the produce case. We need to move out of the store aisles and into the farmer markets and our own backyards gardening, if possible. I hope that helps!

    Jean

    Really loved your message Sayer. I have been following your email messages for some time and I have learned so much. You have made such a difference in my family’s life. Thank you so much for all you do.

    Barbara

    Can you guide an individual to the best test to assess gluten sensitivity?

      Sayer Ji

      This is something that Dr. Tom O’ Bryan is an expert at. I would definitely refer the question to him. Also, keep one thing in mind. My research has lead me to the conclusion that in a vast majority of cases of gluten toxicity there is more going on beneath the radar of serological testing (blood work), because wheat and its components (especially wheat lectin) do not require immune-mediation (i.e. antibody or Th1 mediated responses) in order to either do direct damage to the cell, or to activate nuclear programs within the cells that change that cells phenotype, marking it for destruction or altering it such that it adversely affects health. Nor does one have to have a ‘genetic locus’ of disease susceptibility. I believe that wheat represents a human species-specific intolerance, i.e. we should not be eating it. Here is more on that topic: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/page/opening-pandoras-bread-box-critical-role-wheat-lectin-human-disease

    S

    Are there different strains of wheat ? Do these different strains have different levels of good Vs. bad elements ? Which food does not have addictive properties ?

      Sayer Ji

      Yes! There are many different strains. Wheat, by the way, has six sets of chromosomes and produces a monstrous array of proteins (at least 23,000. See: Wheat Contains Not One, But 23K Potentially Harmful Proteins http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/wheat-contains-not-one-23k-potentially-harmful-proteins). Over time, wheat has been selectively bread, exposed to gamma radiation to produce mutagenic strains, hybridized, and even genetically modified (Oregon wheat field recently yielded an illegal, non-approved GMO form Monsanto’s field trials), so there are too many variables to name. No matter what form you consume (other than ancient forms, e.g. kamut, rye and some spelt), it is so manipulated and altered by humankind that it can not survive without our artificial means of agriculture. It is the farthest thing from “natural” therefore. And when it comes to addictive properties of foods, you are correct — most food has something either in its aesthetic effects or biochemistry that may contribute to “addiction.” Take a look at my article on the topic: Do Hidden Opiates In Our Food Explain Food Addictions? http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/do-hidden-opiates-our-food-explain-food-addictions1

    S

    Do all grains have opiate-like properties ? Is there an equivalent of “richter scale” of all grains Vs, all the good attributes/bad attributes ?

      Sayer Ji

      There is a theory, presented a while ago by Australian biologists, that yes, all grains have addictive properties. Here is an excerpt from my essay The Dark Side of Wheat: 3) WHEAT GLIADIN HAS PHARMACOLOGICAL PROPERTIES Gliadin can be broken down into various amino acid lengths or peptides. Gliadorphin is a 7 amino acid long peptide: Tyr-Pro-Gln-Pro-Gln-Pro-Phe which forms when the gastrointestinal system is compromised. When digestive enzymes are insufficient to break gliadorphin down into 2-3 amino acid lengths and a compromised intestinal wall allows for the leakage of the entire 7 amino acid long fragment into the blood, glaidorphin can pass through to the brain through circumventricular organs and activate opioid receptors resulting in disrupted brain function. There have been a number of gluten exorphins identified: gluten exorphin A4, A5, B4, B5 and C, and many of them have been hypothesized to play a role in autism, schizophrenia, ADHD and related neurological conditions. In the same way that the celiac iceberg illustrated the illusion that intolerance to wheat is rare, it is possible, even probable, that wheat exerts pharmacological influences on everyone. What distinguishes the schizophrenic or autistic individual from the functional wheat consumer is the degree to which they are affected. Below the tip of the “Gluten Iceberg,” we might find these opiate-like peptides to be responsible for bread’s general popularity as a “comfort food”, and our use of phrases like “I love bread,” or “this bread is to die for” to be indicative of wheat’s narcotic properties. I believe a strong argument can be made that the agricultural revolution that occurred approximately 10-12,000 years ago as we shifted from the Paleolithic into the Neolithic era was precipitated as much by environmental necessities and human ingenuity, as it was by the addictive qualities of psychoactive peptides in the grains themselves. The world-historical reorganization of society, culture and consciousness accomplished through the symbiotic relationship with cereal grasses, may have had as much to do with our ability to master agriculture, as to be mastered by it. The presence of pharmacologically active peptides would have further sweetened the deal, making it hard to distance ourselves from what became a global fascination with wheat. An interesting example of wheat’s addictive potential pertains to the Roman army. The Roman Empire was once known as the “Wheat Empire,” with soldiers being paid in wheat rations. Rome’s entire war machine, and its vast expansion, was predicated on the availability of wheat. Forts were actually granaries, holding up to a year’s worth of grain in order to endure sieges from their enemies. Historians describe soldiers’ punishment included being deprived of wheat rations and being given barley instead. The Roman Empire went on to facilitate the global dissemination of wheat cultivation which fostered a form of imperialism with biological as well as cultural roots. The Roman appreciation for wheat, like our own, may have had less to do with its nutritional value as “health food” than its ability to generate a unique narcotic reaction. It may fulfill our hunger while generating a repetitive, ceaseless cycle of craving more of the same, and by doing so, enabling the surreptitious control of human behavior. Other researchers have come to similar conclusions. According to the biologists Greg Wadley & Angus Martin: “Cereals have important qualities that differentiate them from most other drugs. They are a food source as well as a drug, and can be stored and transported easily. They are ingested in frequent small doses (not occasional large ones), and do not impede work performance in most people. A desire for the drug, even cravings or withdrawal, can be confused with hunger. These features make cereals the ideal facilitator of civilization (and may also have contributed to the long delay in recognizing their pharmacological properties).” http://www.greenmedinfo.com/page/dark-side-wheat-new-perspectives-celiac-disease-wheat-intolerance-sayer-ji

    S

    Are any food items besides wheat which do not cause of binding to opiate receptors ?

      Sayer Ji

      The reality is there is an intelligence and elegant co-dependence woven into the relationship between species, but specifically the angiosperms (flowering plants), which constitute approximately 70% of the plants that give us our food, and mammals. The opioid relationship is not necessarily an ‘evil’ one; think of the morphine found in human breast milk. These ‘drugs’ are there for reason, ensuring a certain bonding and ‘glue’ holding together mutually beneficial relationships. In some cases, the relationship may be more unbalanced. There is something known as endopararisitism, for instance, where one species definitely servers the others needs by being consumed from the inside out by it. But even then, who am I to judge? There is a logos inscribed into the cycle of life that is beyond the ability of the human mind to comprehend and enumerate intelligibly. But its fun to try!

    S

    We have 10+ times more genome from bacteria than human cells and most of them in residing in the gut ? Have these bacteria not evolved to digest what ? Why not ? Are there are not any species of bacteria which can break these compounds ?

      Nate

      Thank you, Sayer Ji and Dr. Tom O’Bryan, for this enlightening discussion. I’d like to ask you about something you said, Sayer: “There’s so many possibilities for molecular mimicry and then cross-reactivity, it’s just a nightmare considering our body’s truly not designed to break it down fully. Now of course, cultures have come up, literally, with culturing as a way to get around the issue. The same applies to things like cow’s milk which we’re biologically not capable of breaking down fully without the help of bacteria. So, of course sourdough bread got around some of this problem…” Do you believe that sourdough cultures have the possibility of transforming the wheat so that it is a less non-toxic, or, (dare I say it) beneficial food? As a conscientious baker, I am interested in the roles that sourdough cultures play in breaking down the anti-nutrients in wheat and how these cultures basically make the grain more digestible, more nutritious and, not to mention, better tasting. I have read many articles on the subject, but I have mostly learned about the benefits of sourdough through my personal experiences. Conventional wheat consistently irritates my scalp causing an intense burning, itchiness and psoriasis. Sourdough, on the other hand, does not appear to have any negative side effects. I believe this is due not only to the sourdough cultures, but the fact that I use organic white flour that has the bran and germ stripped away. According to what I have read, these two parts of the wheat berry are what contain most, if not all, of the anti-nutrients. Interestingly, I have had my most severe reactions to sprouted grain breads like Ezekiel. The bread I bake is also fermented for as long as 5 days in the refrigerator where the bacteria continue to do their work breaking down anti-nutrients, converting sugars (lowering the glycemic index) and adding new vitamins. The last question I have is this: If I have a hypothesis that sourdough cultures have the ability to make wheat a truly beneficial food, how and where can I have my bread tested to prove such a claim? Would you or anyone you know be interested in helping me find the answers? Thank you for your time and consideration. Nate PS – There are many articles I have read on the subject of sourdough cultures having a huge impact on minimizing the negative aspects of wheat and maximizing health benefits. Here are a few: http://www.celiac.com/articles/752/1/Study-Finds-Wheat-based-Sourdough-Bread-Started-with-Selected-Lactobacilli-is-Tolerated-by-Celiac-Disease-Patients/Page1.html http://fyiliving.com/research/hydrolyzed-wheat-products-safe-for-celiac-patients/ http://www.danreid.org/health-alerts-sour-dough-health.asp

        Sayer Ji

        Yes! In many ways, without culturing, e.g. yogurt, sourdough, many cultures would not be here today, and the people who constitute them. Without the elaborate multi-chambered forestomaches, for instance, of the ruminant cow, it is exceedingly difficult to breakdown that species’ milk (remember when they used to make Elmer’s glue from cow’s milk?), due to its particularly difficult casein proteins; nor can we break down its preferred food: cereal grasses (keeping in mind that even they get sick when eating the seed form (grains) of the grasses, which is why you give it to them before slaughter; they get too sick if you give it to them early — and even when taking precaution, they often suffer from acidosis, liver abscesses, etc.). And so, of course, culturing these foods is better, and depending on your genotype and epigenotype, your biological lineage may do better, say, than one whose ancestors never consumed milk, or for only a few generations versus hundreds (this is a rare situation, limited to European ancestry). Anyway, when it comes to sprouted wheat, such as Ezekiel — which is something of a posterchild of the ‘health food’ industry, read my article: Opening Pandora’s Bread Box: The Critical Role of Wheat Lectin in Human Disease to learn more: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/page/opening-pandoras-bread-box-critical-role-wheat-lectin-human-disease Also, all my Gluten and Wheat research and articles can be found on this resource page on my website: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/guide/health-guide-wheat-and-gluten-research Best Regards!

          Nate

          Thank you for your reply, Sayer. It is true that acidosis is a problem with grain-fed cattle, but cattle that are strictly grass-fed do not have a problem with acidosis. Good pasture management allows for the seedheads of grasses (not cereal grains) to mature, and then allows the cattle to graze only on the top third of the plant before moving the cattle onto another section of pasture, as if they were grazing the great savannas. Ruminants intuitively know the higher energy of the plant is in the top third of the plant and, given enough pasture, would never fall victim to acidosis. But I digress… I guess what I want to know is whether or not we can change the conversation from, “All wheat is unhealthy and you shouldn’t eat it.” to “Wheat, if prepared properly, is a healthy, beneficial food, and here are some solutions we can all utilize to improve our diets – even while INCLUDING wheat in our diet. I hope that we can qualify not only the types of grains we consume, but also the methods of preparation (i.e. sourdough cultures). This is also why one of my goals is to grow and mill a stand of Red Fife, a heritage wheat. I am hoping this strain of wheat will have even more benefits than some of the newer strains. Now, like I said, if only I could find someone somewhere to test my bread…

            Nate

            I was really hoping we could have an intelligent conversation about sourdough, but I guess not. I keep on coming up against this same problem; I reach out to people who are extremely knowledgeable about the effects of wheat and my questions about sourdough go unanswered. It’s frustrating for sure. There is no doubt in my mind that wheat without going through a proper sifting and fermentation with sourdough cultures is nasty stuff, I would never deny that. I’m just saying, instead of demonizing ALL wheat products, let’s see if we can educate people about the positive aspects of foods made with properly prepared wheat. Does it compromise the message of this entire summit if we discover there is something that is actually good about wheat? Maybe I’m just barking up the wrong tree. Maybe there’s such a lucrative business built up around wheat-bashing that anything contrary to that idea will be ignored – at least it seems that way.

      Sayer Ji

      Good question. You are correct. Preliminary research indicates that there are bacteria both in our mouth and our gut that may break down gluten proteins. But keep in mind. In the same way that the forest floor contains “pathogens” (e.g. fungi) that break down decaying biological matter, some of these are opportunistic, and while breaking down gluten, produce other not so good effects. So, its a double-edged sword.

    S

    Does soaking/sprouting of grains affect production and properties of lectin ?

      Sayer Ji

      Sprouting and soaking may reduce lectins, but certainly won’t remove them. Lectins are not simply ‘excreted’ or localized on the surface of plants we wish to eat, but are part of those plants. You may want to take a look at my article here, as it discusses research on wheat lectin concentrations in sprouted wheat grass still measurable 30+ days after initiation of germination: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/page/opening-pandoras-bread-box-critical-role-wheat-lectin-human-disease

    Grace

    Sayer Ji contributed to saving my life with his info on lectins I happened to read on his excellent site. Getting rid of gluten wasn’t enough for me. I still suffered debilitating inflammation until I axed all grains, legumes and nightshades from my diet. My gratitude for this knowledge is boundless!

      Sayer Ji

      The honor and gratitude is mine. This work has very little meaning to me if it is simply academic. It takes on real value when it helps someone. Best regards

    S

    Why does not NIH, WHO, FDA issues against wheat consumption if wheat is causing so many issues possibly in general public ? This seems to be on the same scale health issues caused by smoking. Wheat consumption seems to be a health hazard of magnanimous proportion. Seems like we need “This may be dangerous to your health” warning on all wheat products (and maybe all grains with gluten)

    Joan

    Dr. Tom, you provided so much more than an outstanding array of speakers. You gave us an opportunity to understand their view points and summaries to clarify. Many were generous in their online response. The content was serious but light-hearted. You made learning fun. The momentum you started can’t help but grow exponentially in the months to come. What a wealth of information for everyone! Thanks some much to your technical staff and excellent presenters.

    S

    Are WGA or equivalent present in lentils/legumes ?

      Sayer Ji

      WGA is a very specific carbohydrate-binding protein. In fact, the word lectin comes from the same root word origin as se-lect. Therefore, there are many different lectins in foods with many different (but highly specific) targets. Some do overlap, however, such as chitin-binding lectin. Here is more on that topic: http://www.greenmedinfo.com/blog/rice-potato-tomato-may-be-inflammatory-wheat

    S

    Why is gluten considered the “only culprit” the disorders being discussed ? How about chlorine/fluoride and other chemicals in water supply which could be affecting the bacteria composition in the gut and killing the bacteria which could curb the efect(s) of the gluten or keep the gluten antibodies in check ?

    Nate

    Thank you, Sayer Ji and Dr. Tom O’Bryan, for this enlightening discussion. I’d like to ask you about something you said, Sayer: “There’s so many possibilities for molecular mimicry and then cross-reactivity, it’s just a nightmare considering our body’s truly not designed to break it down fully. Now of course, cultures have come up, literally, with culturing as a way to get around the issue. The same applies to things like cow’s milk which we’re biologically not capable of breaking down fully without the help of bacteria. So, of course sourdough bread got around some of this problem…” Do you believe that sourdough cultures have the possibility of transforming the wheat so that it is a less non-toxic, or, (dare I say it) beneficial food? As a conscientious baker, I am interested in the roles that sourdough cultures play in breaking down the anti-nutrients in wheat and how these cultures basically make the grain more digestible, more nutritious and, not to mention, better tasting. I have read many articles on the subject, but I have mostly learned about the benefits of sourdough through my personal experiences. Conventional wheat consistently irritates my scalp causing an intense burning, itchiness and psoriasis. Sourdough, on the other hand, does not appear to have any negative side effects. I believe this is due not only to the sourdough cultures, but the fact that I use organic white flour that has the bran and germ stripped away. According to what I have read, these two parts of the wheat berry are what contain most, if not all, of the anti-nutrients. Interestingly, I have had my most severe reactions to sprouted grain breads like Ezekiel. The bread I bake is also fermented for as long as 5 days in the refrigerator where the bacteria continue to do their work breaking down anti-nutrients, converting sugars (lowering the glycemic index) and adding new vitamins. The last question I have is this: If I have a hypothesis that sourdough cultures have the ability to make wheat a truly beneficial food, how and where can I have my bread tested to prove such a claim? Would you or anyone you know be interested in helping me find the answers? Thank you for your time and consideration. Nate PS – There are many articles I have read on the subject of sourdough cultures having a huge impact on minimizing the negative aspects of wheat and maximizing health benefits. Here are a few: http://www.celiac.com/articles/752/1/Study-Finds-Wheat-based-Sourdough-Bread-Started-with-Selected-Lactobacilli-is-Tolerated-by-Celiac-Disease-Patients/Page1.html http://fyiliving.com/research/hydrolyzed-wheat-products-safe-for-celiac-patients/ http://www.danreid.org/health-alerts-sour-dough-health.asp

    Janet

    Thank you for sharing this excellent content – I certainly appreciated the time, work, research & generosity of your efforts – wonderful

    jennifer

    Awesome, thanks!

    ligeia gonzalez

    Excellent presentation. Thanks Sayer Ji for your invaluable work and generously expand nutritional information so valuable the whole human family , Thanks Dr. O’bryen for your brilliant work with The Gluten Summit…Do not Stop!!!

    philomena Denton

    Enjoying the talks. My sister was diagnosed with Coeliac disease 25 yrs ago. She has been on a strict GF diet since. However recently she has been diagnose with Osteoporosis and Arthrithis in the joints. Any suggestions would be useful My daughter has had a biopsy which was neg, however she continues to eat a wheat free diet as she feels so much better.

    Irma

    Thank you Sayer Ji, I have had food related problems all my life including food sensitive to dairy & gluten and other foods. I just learned from the summit about all the neurological & brain related illness that are tied to Gluten including ADD & depression. I was diagnosed with Hashimotto so decided to give up gulten about a month now. My question is will my ADD improve or is the damage done to the brain and cannot be reversed by giving up gluten? Thanks.

    christina

    Can wheat couse Bell’s Pulsy?

    Breanna

    Whats up are using WordPress for your blog platform? I’m new to the blog world but I’m trying to get started and create my own. Do you require any coding expertise to make your own blog? Any help would be greatly appreciated! Have a look at my web blog: naprawa sterowników pomp wtryskowych

    JB

    Great session, but can you ask Sayer Ji to please pronounce chitin properly. I worry that some will discredit him since he doesn’t have a scientific background and I believe his data is great! It’s pronounced KAI-ten. Not kitten. Thanks!!

    JB

    Great session, but can you ask Sayer Ji to please pronounce chitin properly? I worry that some will discredit him since he doesn’t have a scientific background and I believe his data is great! It’s pronounced KAI-ten. Not kitten. Thanks!!

    Antonietta

    Let’s promote a local enterprise by hiring a nearby ‘man & van’ to move our bulky items of furniture. my blog; deliver a package

    Trena

    Adsense is actually a really great program for those who maintain blogs, as blogs get updated all the time and the Adsense possibilities are almost limitless. The website speed test at Secret Search Engine Labs will analyze how fast a page on your site is loading and give you tips on how to improve it. Besides placing advertisers ads on your Blog, you can also make money Blogging by placing Google Adsense into your Blog.

    Brittany

    I came to your Sayer Ji: The Gluten Summit page and noticed you could have a lot more traffic. I have found that the key to running a popular website is making sure the visitors you are getting are interested in your subject matter. There is a company that you can get visitors from and they let you try their service for free. I managed to get over 300 targeted visitors to day to my site. Check it out here: http://1h.ae/el0

Leave a reply

TAKE THE GLUTEN SUMMIT HOME WITH YOU

UPGRADE NOW!
Sign in
classic
Forgot password?
×
Sign up

(*) Required fields

I agree with OptimaSales Terms & Privacy Policy

×